The Cambridge Black History Project

Here to Share & Illuminate Black History

Private Bruce Garnett Wright

Private Bruce Garnett Wright, 1896-1963

Private Bruce Garnett Wright, 1896-1963

  • Attended Rindge Tech 
  • A founder of the Isaac Wilson Taylor VFW Post
  • Author of the only published World War I diary written by a Black soldier
  • Worked at the Kendall Square Post Office for 30 years

Bruce Wright was orphaned at age eleven and came to Cambridge to live with his aunt Gertrude Wright Morgan and her husband, Clement Morgan. He grew up surrounded by the era’s leading Black activists and intellectuals, who took great delight at his violin performances during their get-togethers. Bruce married Lovey Harvey, and they raised three daughters in Cambridge: Nadine Reddick, Lovette Spencer, and Gladys McGuire. He died at the Jamaica Plain Veterans Hospital from a cancer that may have resulted from his being gassed in the trenches in France while fighting for his country. Each Memorial Day and Veterans Day was a solemn occasion to him. 

The CBHP: A Work of Love

The Cambridge Black History Project is an all-volunteer organization of individuals with deep roots in Cambridge. We are committed to research, accurately document, preserve, and illuminate the journeys, accomplishments, and challenges of Black Cantabrigians, and to raise awareness of their stories through educational outreach to the Cambridge community and beyond.

Illuminate

We will shine the light of truth on the history of Cambridge’s Black community and disseminate it here and beyond.

Educate

After thorough research and introspection, we will share our discoveries with others using the best tools available.

Support

We will be accessible to groups and organizations throughout the city in need of our knowledge and expertise.

Educate

We strive to educate others, especially young people, by sharing the discoveries we have uncovered through our research and verification.

Empower

We will endeavor to present factual history in a way that is free of bias, prejudice, and blame that will propel us into a dynamic future.

Charlotte Hawkins Brown

An American author, educator, and founder of the Palmer Memorial Institute. Charlotte distinguished herself as a superior student and a gifted musician in Cambridge.

Roy Allen

One of the nation’s first Black television producers and directors. During the 1950s and well into the early 1990s, he was a Black pioneer in the new medium of television.

Black Trailblazers

Black Cantabrigians have–and continue to–blaze trails in all fields: education, social justice, the arts, business, and medicine. They are lawyers, television producers, star athletes, and political activists. The  Black History Project wants to illuminate the lives and experiences of these oft-forgotten Black Trailblazers. 

Black Trailblazers

TThis project was conceived and developed to illuminate Cambridge’s Black Trailblazers yet to be recognized by the city. It is a work of love by an older generation of Black Cantabrigians, wishing to pass on knowledge we hope to preserve.

Charlotte Hawkins Brown

An American author, educator, and founder of the Palmer Memorial Institute. Charlotte distinguished herself as a superior student and a gifted musician in Cambridge.

Roy Allen

One of the nation’s first Black television producers and directors. During the 1950s and well into the early 1990s, he was a Black pioneer in the new medium of television.